Posts Tagged ‘Phosphorus’

Nutrients in the Garden 12: How To Read A Fertilizer Label

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014
As promised, this week we are looking at fertilizer labels. When you walk into the garden center you will see there are lots of different choices. Below, I show different samples of fertilizers. I am not promoting one or the other; I use a variety of different fertilizers for different purposes. (more…)

Nutrients in the Garden 11: Why Fertilize?

Thursday, April 17th, 2014
Snow and rain have me talking about gardening rather than actually gardening. I’m not complaining. We need the moisture and it gives me the opportunity to help a few friends by planting seeds of inspiration for their first garden. (more…)

Nutrients in the Garden 10: Prepare & Amend

Thursday, April 10th, 2014
Oh, my sore muscles! I took advantage of the sunshine and removed some plant stubble that was in the garden since last fall. It felt good getting dirty and putting in a few hours of hard work. These sore muscles remind me that gardening is great exercise and part of a healthy lifestyle! How many overweight gardeners do you know? (more…)

Science Activity: NPK Bracelets

Monday, February 17th, 2014
This fun bracelet activity is a great way to introduce the three essential plant nutrients: nitrogen (N), phosphate (P) and potassium (K). As students put the various beads together on the bracelet, they will have a better understanding of what plants need to grow. Also, use Nutrients for Life’s free elementary activity book, Fun with the Plant Nutrient Team, to enrich the lesson. If using with the booklet, build the bracelet as students work their way through the book. Interestingly, plants do not technically need soil to grow, as seen with air plants and hydroponic setups, but simply the essential plant nutrients (N-P-K). Grade Levels: 2 to 6 (but we have seen high school teachers adjust this for their classes!) Length: 10 minutes/25 minutes when used with Fun with the Plant Nutrient Team Group size: This activity works well in both small group and large settings Objective: Students will be able to recall what conditions plants needs to grow, such as plant nutrients (in the soil), sunlight, water, and air. Materials needed: (One per student) Note: We purchased individual N, P, and K (9mm) alphabet beads at http://www.namebeads.com. Green chenille sticks (pipe cleaners) or green ribbon Green pony beads Clear pony beads Black or brown pony beads Yellow pony beads Light blue pony beads N, P, K 9mm beads (optional) Purple pony beads Procedure: Place each bead on the chenille stick, while reviewing what each bead represents. (Green chenille stick)—Plants: Farmers grow plants that require nutrients from the soil (Black or brown bead)—Soil: Farmers help to protect the environment by testing their soils to learn if the soil contains the right amount of nutrients. If nutrients are missing, the farmer will add more by adding fertilizer. The three main nutrients needed for the plant to grow are N, P, and K. (N bead - optional) — Nitrogen (Green Bead)—Nitrogen helps the…

Mid-Season Side Dressing

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013
Whew, a week of sunshine and the garden looks great. The tomatoes I last blogged about last week have doubled in size, thanks to the sunshine and fertilizer. We also enjoyed our first harvest of broccoli, cauliflower and lettuce. Yum, yum! My girls gobble up this fresh produce, consuming fresh foods that are a good source of protein, vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, without evening knowing how good it is for them! (more…)

Fascinated with Fertilizer

Monday, June 24th, 2013
In agriculture, we are trying very hard to get the word out: we feed the world. Our mission is to produce a large and safe food supply in a way that is environmentally sound and beneficial. Another organization telling the agriculture story is Illinois Farm Families. They have opened their farms to Chicago area moms; moms who want to know how their food is grown. They bring along their cameras and notepads and share with their peers what they see, hear and learn on the farm. (more…)

Hungry Tomato

Friday, May 31st, 2013
If this is the future of my tomato crop, I am in trouble!  This little guy has been in the ground for two weeks. He has had sun, rain, rain, rain, sun, and rain. He needs a little TLC in the form of warm temperatures and N-P-K!! I cannot control the sun, but I can control the nutrient level in the soil. (more…)
Elements

Give me a P! Explore Phosphate Mining

Monday, April 8th, 2013
What do fire extinguishers, toothpaste and feeding the world have in common? Phosphate! (more…)

Soils and AP Science

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012
Look at these scientists! Lead by AP science teacher, Nancy Bridge, these students measured the amount of NPK (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) present in five different soil types. Did you know they could do that? When I want to know the levels of NPK, I send soil samples to the soil scientist at the university. Skip the university - in Mrs. Bridge’s class, the students get to do it themselves. How cool is that? (more…)

The Secret to a Colorful Landscape

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012
I like to think I have the prettiest house on the block! A little prideful, I know, but I can’t help it! I like being outside, and gardening gives me an excuse to enjoy some sunshine.  I enjoy planting, watering, and nurturing a plant to its fullest potential. To keep my landscape the “prettiest on the block,” I plant a combination of perennials and annuals.  By planting more annuals than perennials, my garden is full of bright colors all summer long. (more…)

Amber Waves of Grain

Friday, June 8th, 2012
Every fall, the wheat farmer enters planting season with great optimism. He has prepared the soil for planting; chosen seeds that have been bred to withstand disease and insects; fertilized with the precise amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium; and then waits to see what the weather holds. This year’s harvest exceeds last year’s harvest, as the winter months provided adequate moisture. It is projected that our American farmers will harvest over two billion bushels of wheat this year. Which is good news for the American consumer; bread will remain on the grocery store shelves. Bread on the table ready to eat, How do we get it from a grain of wheat? The farmer plants the seeds in the ground, The sun comes up and the rain comes down. Bread on the table ready to eat, How do we get it from a grain of wheat? The wheat is crushed by the mill wheel's power Which grinds the grain into soft white flour. Bread on the table ready to eat, How do we get it from a grain of wheat? The baker makes the flour into dough Then puts it in the oven ‘til it cooks just so. Bread on the table ready to eat, That's how we get it from a grain of wheat!   The wheat also calls out to photographers; wheat harvest pictures cover my Facebook page. The pictures share a story of a family business, a story of American agriculture, a story of passion. The first set of pictures were posted by my bible study buddy, Kiley Miller. She farms with her husband and two young boys near Valley Center, KS. Kiley said that the wheat harvest is especially special to her…