Posts Tagged ‘nutrients’

Fertilizing the Garden with the 4R’s of Nutrient Management

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016
The garden looks green and healthy. I spent the last hour pulling weeds! Boy, do they grow fast! The carrots are thinner than I want and my green bean stand is weak as well. I will plant a few more rows of green beans to make up for what didn’t germinate earlier this spring. I have spent hours planting, watering, tilling, hoeing, weeding and now it’s time to fertilize! (more…)

Pick Strawberries Near You!

Friday, May 20th, 2016
Today is Pick Strawberries Day! Have you and your family been out to pick these delicious berries right off the plant yet this spring? There's something wonderful about fresh strawberries eaten straight from the plant.  With each bite, one can taste the careful care taken to produce the delicious red fruit. (more…)

New Resource: Elementary Interactive Lessons

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016
Turn your classroom into a virtual lab with these six interactive lesson plans designed to engage varied learners, enhance digital literacy, and increase overall retention of core concepts. Nutrients for Life Foundation is proud to provide ready-to-go slide decks, called Interactive Lesson Plans, for teachers. Each lesson corresponds to the Foundation’s Nourishing the Planet in the 21st Century elementary curriculum. Available via download, the Interactive Lessons provide enriching visuals and interactive opportunities for students to gain a deep understanding of soil and crop nutrients. Take a look! (more…)

New Resource: High School Interactive Lessons

Monday, February 29th, 2016
  As an organization that tries to make teaching about soil nutrients as easy as possible, we are excited to provide a new, supplemental resource: Interactive Lesson Plans! Interactive Lesson plans are ready-to-go slide decks that correspond to the Foundation’s Nourishing the Planet in the 21st Century curriculum. Available via download, the Interactive Lessons provide enriching visuals and interactive opportunities for students to gain a deep understanding of soil and crop nutrients. Take a look... (more…)

Garden Calendar: August Tips

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015
It was a root and tuber kind of weekend; we pulled carrots and dug potatoes. The harvest makes me thankful for the hours of sweat I put into keeping the weeds out and the soil fertile. August finds me in the kitchen preserving produce from the garden. It makes for some long days but it is well worth it! (more…)

Flower Bed Fertilizing with 4R Nutrient Stewardship

Monday, May 18th, 2015
It’s all about curb appeal. I spend hours every spring sprucing up our landscape and flower beds for a summer of knock out color and attraction. If you want curb appeal, the secret is timely fertilizer application. (more…)

Preparing Soil for Winter

Monday, October 27th, 2014
Leaves are falling and the air is crisp; fall is definitely here. Another year eaten, canned and preserved! The garden season is over. It’s time to put away canning supplies, garden tools and prepare for winter to come. The garden looks barren and boring. I already miss the color and purpose of this space. In preparation for spring, consider Ward Upham’s, K-State Extension Agent’s, advice: “Fall is the preferred time to prepare garden soil for next spring’s vegetable garden. Spring is often wet making it difficult to work soil without forming clods that remain the rest of the season. Fall usually is drier allowing more time to work the soil when it is at the correct soil moisture content. Even if you work soil wet in the fall and form clods, the freezing and thawing that takes place in the winter will break them down, leaving a mellow soil the following spring. Insects often hide in garden debris. If that debris is worked into the soil, insects will be less likely to survive the winter. Diseases are also less likely to overwinter if old plants are worked under. Also, garden debris will increase the organic matter content of the soil. Working the debris into the soil is easier if you mow the old vegetable plants several times to reduce the size of the debris. Fall is an excellent time to add organic matter. Not only are organic materials usually more available in the fall (leaves, rotten hay or silage, grass clippings) but fresher materials can be added in the fall than in the spring because there is more time for them to break down before spring planting. As a general rule, add 2 inches of organic material to the surface of the soil and till it in. Be careful not…

Educate Your Community & Earn Money For Your FFA Chapter

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014
Attention FFA Chapters and FFA Advisors: Educate Your Community & Earn Money For Your FFA Chapter. The Nutrients for Life Foundation is accepting application for the 2014-2015 Helping Communities Grow program! The Foundation wants to partner with FFA chapters to educate the local community about the importance of crop nutrients in food production.  Fertilizer is responsible for 40-50% of the world’s food production. It is a key ingredient to reducing and even eliminating famine. Ford West, former president of The Fertilizer Institute, tells how valuable fertilizer is to humanity.   “There are signs, though, that the day is closer than ever before when famine could be eliminated. Untold numbers of smart people are applying themselves to developing the science of crop production all around the world. Advances in crop genetics, plant health, and production technology all contribute to the ability of modern agriculture to produce more than ever before. But, in the midst of that progress, it is still fertilizer that feeds the world. Land use, human nutrition and the carbon cycle form an intricate set of relationships. Healthy plants use carbon dioxide, give off oxygen and increase soil organic matter, thereby enhancing soil fertility. Harvesting crops removes nutrients in the form of our food, and those nutrients must be replaced to nourish the next crop. For these reasons, soil fertility and fertilizer will remain key components of feeding the world’s hungry population. Our overall standard of living is made possible largely by farmers’ work to produce abundant, high-quality, affordable food. However, as agriculture has grown more productive, fewer people understand it. Agriculture should not become isolated from society. We cannot allow the idea that “food comes only from the supermarket” to take root. It is nearly impossible for people to make good decisions about any subject unless those decisions…

FFA Friday: Idaho

Friday, September 12th, 2014
Another FFA Friday post!  Idaho had eleven participating chapters in the Helping Communities Grow program this year. Congratulations to the top three chapters, Salmon FFA, Hansen FFA, and Genesee FFA. (more…)

Problem Solving: Garden Challenges

Monday, August 25th, 2014
Every gardener faces challenges in their garden at some point. Arguably, the most frustrating issue is when the garden isn't producing. I recently received this text from a friend, “Garden is weird; it’s tall and full, but not producing.” (more…)

Problem Solving: Weeds

Thursday, August 14th, 2014
For the first time ever, I used the lawnmower in the garden! Yep, the weeds were so bad; I decided to mow them down. It was a quick solution to a weedy mess! Don’t worry; I didn’t mow the entire garden, just one small section that got out of control. The garden looks better and I don’t feel guilty about letting the weeds get out of control.  Problem solving and gardening go hand in hand! Mowing was the answer this time! (more…)