Posts Tagged ‘Farming’

Nutrients in the Garden 18: Oh Hail

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014
Oh Hail! I watched the dark clouds roll in as I weeded the garden.  I thought I would weed until it started raining, however, when the lightning started, I headed into the house. Within twenty minutes, the garden was gone. Hail and high winds shredded my tender plants as I helplessly watched from the window. (more…)

Meet Pink Tractor

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014
We have a big garden, a few acres of brome hay, one heifer, two steers and a barn full of cats. I wish I could say that was enough to make me a farmer, but it doesn’t. I just tell people we pretend to farm. (more…)

Happy Earth Day!

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014
  It’s Earth Day, so let’s celebrate the Earth! I love the feel of finely tilled soil and it’s earthy smell. Did you know that only 3 % of the entire Earth provides all of our food? We are dependent on this tiny bit of Earth for every morsel we put to our mouth. (more…)

Garden Recipe: Pumpkin Puree

Monday, January 13th, 2014
Yes, those are pie pumpkins around Christmas decorations. Embarrassing as it may be, I thought that I would have used them before now. I should have made pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving and Christmas, but we traveled for both holidays and I didn't have to do any baking. The pumpkins just sat and waited... Now that the holidays are over and we have settled back into our routine, I have made the pumpkins a priority! Frankly, I am surprised they did not rot! Making pumpkin puree is simple and straightforward. We are accustomed to the convenience of the grocery store, but I don't think we realize how easy food preservation can be. I’m not saying that I make everything from scratch but when I do, I feel a sense of satisfaction and pride. Better late than never; I first washed all seven pumpkins in the sink (they had a dusting of Christmas glitter on them). These left over pumpkins happen to be pie pumpkins, but you can make puree with all types of pumpkins, although different varieties have a different texture and water content. Next, I cut the tops off and removed the “guts.” I saved the seeds to roast and the rest of the pulp went into the compost. I cut each pumpkin into four to eight pieces. I put the pieces on baking pans, pulp up or down. Some people have a strong opinion on which way is better; I don’t think it makes much of a difference. You can form your own opinion when you make your own puree. Bake them in the oven at 350 degrees for forty-five minutes or until the pulp is soft. Remove from the oven and peel the rind from the pulp. I started with a knife, but then realized it wasn't necessary…

I’m Farming and I Grow It

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012
How many of you have spent a few extra minutes watching silly YouTube videos before?  Social media websites, like YouTube, have the potential to reach millions of people around the world with the simple click of a button.  On June 25th, the Peterson brothers of Kansas posted a parody music video titled “I’m Farming and I Grow It” on YouTube, and it quickly went viral. Today, 4.9 million viewers have watched them dance and sing the message that farming is still a family business.  My three daughters and I loved the song; we were laughing and dancing along with the Peterson brothers.  The catchy tune had us singing, “I’ve got passion for my plants, and I ain’t afraid to show it, show it, show it.” Their commitment to agriculture came alive through the computer screen. (more…)

A Teacher’s Book List on Gardening and Agriculture

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012
Rhoda Switzer, a teacher at an independent Montessori school in Maryland, recently created a comprehensive book list about agriculture, gardening, and everything in between for a Nutrients for Life workshop at the Maryland Association for Outdoor Education Conference (MAEOE).  As a whole, children today know less and less about where their food comes from and what it takes to get food on the table.  But teachers like Rhoda Switzer are working to educate students on the importance of agriculture in their day-to-day lives.  In the spring, her students work on Lesson 5 of our Nourishing the Planet in the 21st Century elementary curriculum:  Planning a Garden.  Ms. Switzer sees the value environmental education, such as having a vermicompost bin as a classroom pet and integrating environmental lessons into her classes.  Her school is also developing and installing a new playground for the school, in which they aim to have certified as a Nature Explorer space through the Arbor Day Foundation, and maintaining a butterfly garden.  Below is an excerpt from her book list; do you have other books to suggest for teaching soil science? (more…)

Spring Break

Thursday, March 24th, 2011
Spring break! Ah, a breath of fresh air and a change in our routine. I need spring break as much as the students and teachers. Instead of going south we head north to spend a week helping my dad on the farm. I admit I would enjoy the 80 degree weather the south promises! It's 30 degrees today and I’m wearing my winter coat again. Anyone can experience a sunny beach and the ocean but not everyone can experience a week of farming fun. (more…)

Modern Agriculture

Tuesday, August 24th, 2010
My family is five of the 6.8 billion living here on planet Earth. It’s hard for me to fathom that in 2050, when I am 76 years old; they predict the population to be 9 billion!  (more…)