Archive for the ‘Foundation Resource’ Category

New Resource: Elementary Interactive Lessons

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016
Turn your classroom into a virtual lab with these six interactive lesson plans designed to engage varied learners, enhance digital literacy, and increase overall retention of core concepts. Nutrients for Life Foundation is proud to provide ready-to-go slide decks, called Interactive Lesson Plans, for teachers. Each lesson corresponds to the Foundation’s Nourishing the Planet in the 21st Century elementary curriculum. Available via download, the Interactive Lessons provide enriching visuals and interactive opportunities for students to gain a deep understanding of soil and crop nutrients. Take a look! (more…)

New High School Resource: Feeding the World & Protecting the Environment

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016
Recently, the Nutrients for Life Foundation released the latest resource for high school teachers entitled Feeding the World & Protecting the Environment. “We are thrilled to offer this resource at a time of world environmental awareness and unparalleled technological advancements that support responsible fertilizer use,” says Nutrients for Life Foundation Executive Director Harriet Wegmeyer. (more…)

The Resources You Need To Start Your School Garden

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016
  I believe every school should have a garden. Think back to your education, what do you remember? What teacher had an impact? I bet those memories are tied to an activity or teacher who brought innovation and experiential learning to the classroom.   What makes a school garden successful? Purpose, People and Passion   “Gardening requires lots of water – most of it in the form of perspiration.” -Lou Erickson   Purpose: The success of a school garden depends upon the fertility of the soil and the number of times the garden is used. The garden has to have purpose. The class has to have a reason to visit the garden, if not it sits idle, full of potential and completely untapped. Bring the class to the garden every day, even if just for a minute. A garden that is seen is a garden that thrives. Find curriculum that enhances the classroom academic standards. Use curriculum that gives you a reason to spend time in the garden; incorporate science, math, English, reading, nutrition and exercise into garden time. If the garden has purpose, it will be used and it will produce more than fruit; it will produce knowledge, understanding, application, and change.   People: It’s nearly impossible to build, maintain and grow a school garden by yourself. It takes a team of people. Create a committee; include staff, custodial team members, administration, parents and students. Communicate frequently, share a vision and move forward together.   Passion: A garden is living and it takes dedication to make it productive, especially in a school setting. Most school gardens begin when one or two individuals have a strong desire. Passion can dwindle as weeds grow, in addition to time and financial constraints. The passion to keep a garden growing must be continually fertilized with…

New Resource: High School Interactive Lessons

Monday, February 29th, 2016
  As an organization that tries to make teaching about soil nutrients as easy as possible, we are excited to provide a new, supplemental resource: Interactive Lesson Plans! Interactive Lesson plans are ready-to-go slide decks that correspond to the Foundation’s Nourishing the Planet in the 21st Century curriculum. Available via download, the Interactive Lessons provide enriching visuals and interactive opportunities for students to gain a deep understanding of soil and crop nutrients. Take a look... (more…)

Contest: Racing to Feed the World through Soil Science

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014
Attention High School Science Teachers: Start Your Engines! Nutrients for Life Foundation has partnered with BRANDT Consolidated - a leading agricultural company that serves growers around the globe –to organize a “Racing to Feed the World” contest for high school students. (more…)

Teacher Retreat Recap: A Meeting of the Minds at the Mine

Monday, July 28th, 2014
With beautiful mountain ranges as a backdrop, eight educators from around the country recently convened at the Simplot Smoky Canyon mine to “talk soil.” Their mission was an important one: guide the development of future education materials for the Nutrients for Life Foundation. (more…)

New Resource: High School Curriculum Update!

Thursday, May 29th, 2014
 Nutrients for Life Foundation Launches New Science Curriculum for High School Students Attention teachers! We are excited to announce the unveiling of the second edition to our Smithsonian-reviewed high school curriculum, Nourishing the Planet in the 21st Century. This resource supports our mission to promote soil science in the classroom and teach students about the basic aspects of plant biology as it relates to food production. (more…)

From the Ground Up: The Science of Soil Launch in Review

Friday, May 2nd, 2014
Exactly one month ago, we launched our middle-school focused educational program with Discovery Education! From the Ground Up: The Science of Soil is designed to highlight the importance of soil, soil nutrients and soil science to sustainable global plant and crop growth. (more…)

From the Ground Up: The Science of Soil Launch

Monday, March 17th, 2014
The Foundation is excited to announce it is now expanding its reach into the digital education world! In collaboration with Discovery Education,  the Foundation is making an impact with a program called From the Ground Up: The Science of Soil.  (more…)

New Resource: Potash Video & Potassium Cycle Poster

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014
The Nutrients for Life Foundation is proud to provide its latest free education resources: The Potash Mining Video and Potassium Cycle Poster. Every plant needs three basic elements to grow nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Potassium (K) is important to plants because it acts as a regulator. It helps plants efficiently use water, transfer food, and protect against structural stress. If a plant is deficient in potassium, it is much more susceptible to stunted growth and disease. K is found naturally in soil, but sometimes must be replaced, especially after years of growing plants on the same land. So where do we get the K in fertilizer that provides all these great benefits? From mining potash in deposits of ancient evaporated inland oceans. To learn more, watch The Potash Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uujIepkI6Ow   Also, check out our new Potassium Cycle Poster available free through our website. It is so meaningful for science classes to expose students to natural biogeochemical cycles, such as the potassium cycle. Even if students are unable to recall every aspect of the potassium or phosphorus cycle months after your class, the concept of the cyclical nature of earth’s major resources is an essential concept for tomorrow’s generation.   Mineral weathering, plant residues, animal sources, and fertilizers supply K to the plant roots. In some soils, mineral weathering primarily supplies enough potassium to provide sufficient amounts of K, with help from plant residues, biosolids, and animal sources. However, continual use of the soil for crops or gardening can deplete potassium faster than natural weather and other sources can replenish it. Runoff, erosion, plant harvest, and leaching can be causes for potassium loss. In those cases, potassium fertilizer can restore amounts. We hope these new resources invigorate your soil science lessons and are a helpful addition to your classroom! Keep up with the Foundation- Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | YouTube 

Teacher Spotlight: Sue Meggers

Thursday, October 31st, 2013
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